Belize Boutique Resort and Spa
BELIZE TIME:   
Where Is Belize
 
Belize is a small country on the Central American mainland. Tucked in underneath Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, Belize enjoys more than 200 miles of Caribbean coastline. To the west and south, Belize shares both a land and maritime border with Guatemala. The country also has several hundred islands located along the vast Belize Barrier Reef, the largest coral reef system in the western hemisphere.
 
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Belize is roughly the same size as the state of Vermont, but it only has a fraction of the population. The largest city, Belize City, has around 70,000 inhabitants and is located on the northeastern coast. Under European rule, the country was known as British Honduras, and its capital was Belize City. Today, however, the capital is now Belmopan, located far inland in Cayo District. 

Despite its small size, the landscape of Belize is incredibly diverse. Offshore, the islands and atolls of the Belize Barrier Reef are some of the most ecologically diverse marine environments on the planet. On the mainland, pure white sandy beaches make way for vast stretches of tropical rainforests, thick jungles, and broadleaf forests. And, despite its popularity as a tourist destination, much of Belize remains uninhabited and unexplored.
 
Indeed, it is believed that many more ancient Maya cities and monuments are still waiting to be discovered. Built by one of the most advanced civilizations of the ancient world, the Maya dominated Belize for over 3,000 years, building astronomical observatories, temples, ball courts, and immense pyramids all across the country. Today, ancient Maya sites like Xunantunich, Altun Ha, and Lamanai are popular attractions, their towering structures having withstood the tests of time.

More than half of Belize's territory is protected by law in the form of a national park, animal refuge, or wilderness sanctuary. More than 500 species of birds have been recorded in Belize, and the country is home to exotic animals like black howler monkeys, harpy eagles, giant iguanas, and five different species of big cats, including ocelots, pumas, and jaguars.
 
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Belize is a melting pot society composed of many different cultures, including the living descendents of the ancient Maya, Mestizos originally from neighboring Mexico, Mennonite farmers from Europe, Chinese, East Indians, the Afro-Caribbean Garifuna people, and the Creoles, which speak a unique dialect of English.

Ready for an exciting vacation in Belize? Stay at the Belize Boutique Resort and Spa. Located just a few miles from the Belize international airport, this hotel is an oasis of comfort and luxury located in the heart of the Belizean jungle. And when it comes time for exploration and adventure, the Belize resort is close to all of the top destinations on both the mainland and offshore reef, including ancient Maya ruins, national parks, and animal sanctuaries.
 
 
A Short History of Belize
 
No one is quite sure where the name Belize came from, but many people think it's from an old Mayan phrase meaning "muddy waters." Whatever its origin, Belize has been home to advanced civilizations for more than 3,000 years. Long before the Europeans arrived, up to two million Maya people lived within the borders of what is now Belize, the builders of enormous cities like Altun Ha, Lamanai, and Xunantunich. 

Archeologists now call the height of the ancient Maya civilization the Classic Period, which ran from around 300 A.D. to around 900 A.D., when, for reasons that aren't very well understood, their civilization collapsed and most of the larger cities were abandoned. Some Maya outposts continued until the end of the Post-Classic Period (1000 A.D. to around 1500 A.D.) when the Spanish crushed the remnants of one of the planet's most advanced civilizations. 

The first European to visit the area that is now Belize was Christopher Columbus. In 1502, as part of his final voyage to the Western Hemisphere, Columbus sailed down the coast of Belize, naming the Bay of Honduras which lies along Belize's extreme southern border. The Spanish made several incursions into Belize but were met with stiff resistance from the surviving Maya population. 

But without any gold or other valuable resources, Belize was largely untouched by Europeans until the 1700s. Pirates, shipwrecked sailors, and a motley crew of rugged individuals who were primarily of English or Scottish extraction moved to the coastal areas of Belize to begin logging valuable hardwoods. They were soon collectively known as Baymen, named after the nearby Bay of Honduras. 

After a series of skirmishes, treaties, and global political intrigue, the Spanish navy clashed with the Bayman and a small number of British ships just off the coast of the island of St. George's Caye in 1798. The Spanish were repelled, and shortly afterward, Britain claimed the region as its new colony of British Honduras. 

With the arrival of British administrative forces, the population of Belize soon swelled. Enslaved Africans, now known as Creole, along with indigenous people from nearby Mexico, now known as Mestizos, began farming and developing the agricultural industry in the country. Chinese laborers and the Garifuna people from the Caribbean also emigrated to the country. Add in Mennonites escaping religious persecution in Europe and a small group of Confederate veterans from the American Civil War, and Belize soon became a multicultural society. 

In 1973, British Honduras changed its name to Belize. In 1981, Belize gained full independence from Great Britain.

 

Belize!  It's Not Just A Vacation!  It's An Experience!

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